Skip to content

News

Crypto industry hardens attempts to influence EU policy

Notice to all FCA regulated firms with exposure to cryptoassets
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

In what will almost certainly turn out to be an ill informed attempt to influence policy, more than 40 crypto business leaders have written to the European Union asking not to require crypto firms to disclose transaction details and dial down attempts to bring into line rapidly growing decentralised finance platforms.

The European Union, like countries and jurisdictions across the globe, is working to tame the freewheeling crypto sector. The EU is ahead of the US and UK in developing a set of rules for the $2.1 trillion sector.

In a letter reported by Reuters sent to 27 EU finance ministers, crypto businesses asked policymakers to ensure their regulations did not go beyond rules already in place under the global Financial Action Task Force (FATF), which set standards for combating money laundering.

The rules, opposed by US exchange Coinbase, would require crypto firms to gather and hold information on who is involved in digital currency transfers. EU lawmakers last month voted to back new safeguards for tracing bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.

In response to last month’s vote, 46 European crypto industry leaders and organisations said in their letter that the proposals “will put every digital asset owner at risk” by leading to public disclosure of transaction details and wallet addresses. This would reduce crypto holders’ privacy and safety, the letter’s organisers said.

The EU is also introducing a wider framework, known as MiCAR, to regulate all issuers and service providers in the EU dealing with crypto assets. The European Parliament recently approved its draft of the regulation, which will be negotiated with the EU’s executive branch and heads of member states.

The letter asked that the EU excludes decentralised projects, which includes decentralised finance or “DeFi”, from requirements to register as legal entities. It also said that certain decentralised “stablecoins” should not be subject to the MiCA regulation.

CoinShares CEO Jean-Marie Mognetti, who organised the letter, said that Europe currently had more complex regulations than other regions, which deterred businesses from growing in Europe.

Diana Biggs, chief security officer at DeFi Technologies, who also organised the letter, said she was keen to increase the influence of the European crypto industry on policymaking in Brussels.

Source: Payments Cards and Mobile

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Related Posts

EBA publishes Guidelines on role and responsibilities of the AML/CFT compliance officer

The European Banking Authority has released a renewed statement on what it means to be a compliance officer. Released on June 14th, the statement details the role and responsibilities expected
Read More >

Regulating finance for the UK – Charles Randall, Chair of the FCA and PSR

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has released a transcript of a speech given by the Chair of the FCA and PSR, Charles Randell, which covers the idea of regulating finance
Read More >