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FCA’s move to faster and more transparent enforcement

FCA enforcement
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In a recent announcement, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) unveiled plans to overhaul its enforcement approach, opting for a faster and more transparent process. Among the key changes is the decision to disclose the names of firms under investigation much earlier in the proceedings, a departure from the previous practice of keeping investigations confidential until their conclusion.

The FCA’s rationale behind this shift is multifaceted. Firstly, by making investigations public sooner, the regulator aims to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward with information regarding potential misconduct within firms. This transparency is expected to create an environment conducive to reporting malpractice and enhancing industry accountability.

Moreover, the FCA seeks to bolster public confidence in its regulatory efforts. Therese Chambers, joint Executive Director of Enforcement and Market Oversight at the FCA, emphasised this point, stating, “By being more transparent when we open and close cases, we can enhance public confidence by showing that we are on the case.”

Another key objective of the initiative is to strengthen deterrence within the industry. By publicly naming firms under investigation, the FCA sends a clear message that misconduct will not be tolerated, aiming to dissuade other firms from engaging in similar malpractices and fostering a culture of compliance and integrity.

However, the decision to announce an investigation will be made on a case-by-case basis, considering factors such as whether it’s in the public interest to do so, whether it will protect and enhance the integrity of the UK financial system, reassure the public, or assist in ongoing investigations. It’s important to note that announcing an investigation does not imply that the FCA has determined misconduct or breaches of its requirements. Investigations into individuals will typically not be announced.

For firms operating in the financial services sector, being publicly named as subjects of investigation can have significant reputational and business implications. Therefore, prioritising compliance, risk management, and ethical conduct is essential to mitigate the risk of regulatory scrutiny.

How Neopay can help

By partnering with Neopay, firms can access comprehensive compliance solutions tailored to their specific needs, helping them navigate regulatory requirements, mitigate risks, and uphold the highest standards of integrity and professionalism.

Neopay’s suite of services encompasses regulatory compliance, risk assessment, training, and ongoing support, enabling firms to stay abreast of evolving regulatory landscape and proactively address compliance challenges. Through proactive compliance management and diligent risk mitigation measures, firms can safeguard their reputation, protect consumer interests, and avoid being named and shamed in enforcement actions.

To find out more about how we can support your business, contact us here.

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